jeudi 2 juin 2011

Quoi de neuf dans la PAL?

Des livres de fille!!! On aime ça!!! Surtout lorsqu'on a même pas à sortir pour les avoir... Et vous, qu'avez-vous ajouté à votre PAL dernièrement?

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children's imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn't stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an "excitement addict." Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever.

Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town -- and the family -- Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents' betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home.

What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.

For two decades, Jeannette Walls hid her roots. Now she tells her own story. A regular contributor to, she lives in New York and Long Island and is married to the writer John Taylor.

When two estranged sisters inherit a Hamptons beach house, they search for fortune but find love instead.

Cassie and Peck are half sisters with little in common beyond a shared last name-that is, until their beloved aunt Lydia bequeaths them equal shares of her ramshackle old cottage in the Hamptons with instructions to "seek the thing of utmost value" within it. Cassie and Peck fantasize about discovering a lost Jackson Pollock, or a first edition of The Great Gatsby, as they revel in one last summer of fabulous parties and nostalgia.

Widely and well reviewed, Danielle Ganek's The Summer We Read Gatsby captures the spirit of New York's most glamorous resort town, and will captivate readers with its spellbinding blend of romance, mystery, and charmingly eccentric characters.

Richly imagined, remarkably written story of the woman who created Little Women- and how love changed her in ways she never expected.

Deftly mixing fact and fiction, Kelly O'Connor McNees returns to the summer of 1855, when vivacious Louisa May Alcott is twenty-two and bursting to free herself from family and societal constraints and do what she loves most. Stuck in small-town New Hampshire, she meets Joseph Singer, and as she opens her heart, Louisa finds herself torn between a love that takes her by surprise and her dream of independence as a writer in Boston. The choice she must make comes with a steep price that she will pay for the rest of her life.

4 commentaires:

Ankya a dit...

Très bons moments de lectures en perspective pour ce grand weekend !

Jules a dit...

Ankya: espérons-le!

Valérie a dit...

Je n'avais pas trop aimé Le Château de verre que j'avais trouvé un peu misérabiliste mais bon, elle ne peut pas changer la misère dans laquelle elle a vécu.

Jules a dit...

Valérie: je ne savais même pas qu'il était traduit!! :)